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New Potato Varieties

New Potato Varieties

New Canadian potato variety named after Alliston, spud capital of Ontario
In mid-July, a new variety of potato named Alliston was officially registered with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, making it the first tater in history to take its name from the potato capital of Ontario.
Wednesday, August 7, 2019
Cavendish Farms to open Potato Research Centre in Prince Edward Island
Canadian potato processing company Cavendish Farms, a subsidiary of J.D. Irving, announced last week that it will build a new potato research and plant breeding centre in New Annan, Prince Edward Island.
Four 'resistancy' genes in current commercial potato varieties already defeated by Phytophthora Infestans
Recent research at the James Hutton Institute suggests that limited genetic differences in potato lineages has left British and American spuds vulnerable to late blight, the disease that caused the Irish potato famine.
Wednesday, July 31, 2019
En ocho años el salto de calidad dado por el cultivador de patata es espectacular
De la mano del Director de Operaciones de Patatas Meléndez, Juan Manuel Coello, AgroNews ha visitado una de las parcelas en las que Santiago Domínguez, uno de los agricultores de referencia para el sector ha iniciado los arranques.
Wednesday, July 17, 2019
Ayrshire potatoes granted EU protected status
Ayrshire potatoes have been granted special status under EU rules to protect them from imitation.
España: Comienzo inminente de la campaña de patatas de Castilla y León
Esta semana comenzará la campaña de patata en Castilla y León. Eduardo Arroyo, presidente de la Asociación de Productores de Patata de Castilla y León (APPACYL)
Wednesday, July 10, 2019
Cornell University improves global access to potato breeding material
Plant breeders and geneticists of Cornell University have released more than 50 potato varieties since 1908. Now they are expanding their efforts to make more wild potato seeds available to potato breeders around the world.
A team of biochemists at FAU led by Prof. Dr. Uwe Sonnewald have discovered why potato plants form significantly lower numbers of tubers or sometimes none at all at higher temperatures. The authors of the study from FAU (from left): PD Dr. Sophia Sonnewald, Günter Lehretz, Dr. José María Corral García and Prof. Dr. Uwe Sonnewald. (Courtesy: FAU / Rabih Mehdi)
If there’s one thing potato plants don’t like, it’s heat. If the temperature is too high, potato plants form significantly lower numbers of tubers or sometimes none at all. Biochemists at FAU have now discovered the reason why.
Wednesday, May 15, 2019