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Alex Docherty of Sky View Farms in Elmwood, P.E.I., said a tarp barn at his farm was completely destroyed and another was severely damaged.

Alex Docherty of Sky View Farms in Elmwood, Prince Edward Island said a tarp barn at his farm was completely destroyed and another was severely damaged.

Prince Edward Island (PEI) potato farmers say they are concerned excessive moisture in the fields caused by Fiona may lead their produce to rot in storage — though they hope that is not the case. Greg Donald, general manager of the P.E.I. Potato Board, said the post-tropical storm came just as farmers were set to start harvesting and storing their crops.

Greg Donald, general manager of the P.E.I. Potato Board:
 
"Some of the potato farms had major damage to potato storages and buildings, and some of their infrastructure. Lots of trees down to contend with in fields. And then certainly the moisture."
Donald pointed out that it rained in the days leading to and following the storm's passage through P.E.I. He said all that moisture may affect the quality of the crop, if it doesn't straight-out lead to rotting.

Greg Donald:
 
"We're hopeful that there won't be significant issues. Farmers will pay a lot of attention to, you know, avoiding low-lying areas and poorly drained areas. But at this point we won't really know until they get into the field and dig in more. But that would be a major concern."
Damaged warehouses

Donald said only a limited number of warehouses had "significant damage." He said three warehouses lost their entire roofs, and others were affected to varying degrees.
 

Alex Docherty looking at a destroyed building at his farm

Alex Docherty of Sky View Farms in Elmwood said a storage building and a tarp barn at his farm were completely destroyed, while another tarp barn was severely damaged.

Alex Docherty:
 
"We don't even have time to clean the mess-up right now. We don't know what's going to happen. We're going to have to wait for insurance adjusters. It's going to be quite a schmozzle for the whole Island."
Greg Donald:
 
"There's been a lot of efforts in the last couple of days with discussions and to find alternative places to put those potatoes. There are other needs, places with livestock and things like that are looking at some of those warehouses. But it looks like they're going to be able to find space."
Donald said power is also a concern.

Greg Donald:
 
"I know the power company is doing a tremendous job, but there's still issues with power and you have to have power at a warehouse when you harvest to unload the potatoes. We sent out a note a couple of days ago to anybody that has power and spare generators and kind of set up a little bit of a system there."

"Farmers are definitely — and the community — you know, are helping each other and so those that have power are lending generators to those who need it."
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